The Plymouth Philharmonic is about to unleash an effervescent shower of star-studded entertainment with children leading the way, and it’s all happening at 3 p.m. this Sunday.

 

PLYMOUTH – The Plymouth Philharmonic is about to unleash an effervescent shower of star-studded entertainment with children leading the way, and it’s all happening at 3 p.m. this Sunday.

The Phil’s much-anticipated family concert will feature the Plymouth Children’s Chorus and the winner of the South Shore Conservatory Youth Concerto Competition, 16-year-old pianist Owen Masur of Quincy, playing Mozart’s dramatic “Piano Concerto No. 20 in D Minor.”

But first, the Plymouth Children’s Chorus, under the direction of Karen DeVoe, will envelop the audience in the joyful music of Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast,” with “Be Our Guest,” before performing Irving Berlin’s inspirational “Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor,” which owes its title and theme to Emma Lazarus’ poem “The New Colossus,” engraved on the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty. The chorus will also sing “Can You Hear Me?” a wonderfully inclusive song that features the children signing, using American Sign Language.

Phil Conductor Steven Karidoyanes said this piece is so moving and beautiful, he has cried while conducting it.

To honor the Plymouth 400th Commemoration, the Phil will perform Dvorak’s “New World Symphony” as well as a rarity: “The Governor Bradford March” by Leroy Anderson.

“Who knew there was such a thing!” Phil Conductor Steven Karidoyanes said of the Anderson music. “We’re all such fans of the clever and novel music by Leroy Anderson like ‘Bugler’s Holiday,’ ‘Sleigh Ride’ and ‘Syncopated Clock.’ When I discovered Anderson’s march named for William Bradford, the longtime governor of Plymouth Colony, I knew we had to perform it during this commemorative anniversary year. It has all the hallmarks of Leroy Anderson’s best music. It’s spirited, colorful and fun!”

The Dvorjak selection is as recognizable as Beethoven’s “Symphony No. 5,” Karidoyanes said, written while the composer was living in America in the late 19th Century.

“The music takes its inspiration from the great scope of landscape that is the American continent,” he said. “Each movement of this symphony is almost a descriptive poem of the nature of this country as he saw it.”

And, what’s particularly special about the Mozart piece that Masur will perform is the inclusion of Beethoven’s cadenza in it, which is the portion of the music where it stops for a solo. A cadenza can be either improvised or composed. In this case, Karidoyanes noted that Beethoven composed the solo specifically for this piece. Mozart was Beethoven’s senior and praised the boy during one of his early performances, saying that the audience should take note because Ludwig was going places. The cadenza, likely written after Mozart’s early death, functions like a “right back atcha” from the master, and illustrates the mutual regard between these iconic composers.

As always, the Family Concert will participate in the national food drive Orchestras Feeding America. Audience members are encouraged to take a nonperishable food item to benefit the Food Warehouse of Greater Plymouth.

The Family Concert is set for 3 p.m. Sunday, March 8, and, for early arrivals, a hands-on instrument demonstration preceding the concert will take place at 2 p.m.

Tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for children through age 12, and are available at plymouthphil.org or by calling 508-746-8008.